Preparation of Fine, Spherical, Composite Powder by Spray Pyrolysis

  • Radenka Maric
  • Takehisa Fukui
  • Satoshi Ohara
  • Toru Inagaki
  • Hiroyuki Yoshida
  • Jun-ichi Fujita
  • Kazuhiro Miura

Abstract

Spray pyrolysis (SP) is an advanced method which enables spherical powder to be prepared through the pyrolysis or hydrolysis reaction of the atomized droplet containing the precursor.1–3 To date most reactor systems have been designed such that the thermolysis and sintering processes overlap. Overlap of these processes in a single droplet could significantly affect densification of the particles. Therefore, a special separate reactor has been recently used in JFCC, see Fig.1, to obtain maximum control of the evaporation, thermolysis and sintering processes and because of this the time temperature conditions are significantly different. Most of the studies4–6 emphasized the compositional flexibility for synthesizing ceramic powders but there have been few attempts to understand or model the processes and factors that affect the production of particles with controlled size and morphology. Recent achievements in the field of the synthesis of powder by powder processing have shown that chemical and physical properties of ceramic materials are highly dependent on the morphology and chemical composition of the starting powder.7,8 Therefore, various properties of ceramic materials are expected to improve by controlling the morphology and composition of the starting powder.

Fig. 1

Spray pyrolysis equipment

Keywords

Hydrolysis Hydrogen Peroxide Furnace Zirconia Epoxy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Radenka Maric
    • 1
  • Takehisa Fukui
    • 1
  • Satoshi Ohara
    • 1
  • Toru Inagaki
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Yoshida
    • 2
  • Jun-ichi Fujita
    • 2
  • Kazuhiro Miura
    • 3
  1. 1.Japan Fine Ceramics CenterNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.The Kansai Electric Power Company Inc.Technical Research CenterHyogoJapan
  3. 3.Kanden Kako Co., Ltd.HyogoJapan

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