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Social Stress and Community Psychology

  • Barbara Snell Dohrenwend

Abstract

Two questions that embrarrass community psychologists are: “What do community psychologists do?” “What’s the difference between community psychology and clinical psychology?” A conceptual model is proposed to help to find answers to these questions. The model describes a process whereby psychosocial stress leads to psychopathology. The argument is developed that the apparently disparate activities of community psychologists are uniformly directed at undermining the stress process but, given the complexity of this process, vary because they tackle it at different points.

Keywords

Stressful Event Stress Reaction Stressful Life Event Stress Model Psychosocial Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Snell Dohrenwend

There are no affiliations available

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