Representativeness Assessments

  • Patrick S. Bourgeron
  • Hope C. Humphries
  • Mark E. Jensen

Abstract

Conservation scientists, planners, and managers generally agree that the ultimate goal of conservation planning is the comprehensive protection of all aspects of biodiversity (Noss and Cooperrider, 1994); consequently maintaining all ecosystem components over time and over large areas is a primary objective (Noss, 1983). To achieve its goal, conservation planning requires knowledge of the linkages among the various components of ecosystems (e.g., species, biogeochemical processes), including human factors (see Chapters 27 and 29), across gradients of spatial and temporal variability (see Chapters 2, 3, and 26), and integrated within the socioeconomic context (see Chapter 9). Therefore, basic characterization of ecological patterns and processes of interest at all scales relevant to ecosystems (see Chapters 2, 3, 22, and 23) is needed. This knowledge should be used to formulate realistic conservation goals and strategies and to place networks of conservation areas into the proper ecological and socioeconomic context for implementation at relevant ecological, social, and economic scales (see Chapter 35).

Keywords

Stratification Stein Lution Crest Stake 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick S. Bourgeron
  • Hope C. Humphries
  • Mark E. Jensen

There are no affiliations available

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