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Fundamental Access Methods

  • Yannis Manolopoulos
  • Yannis Theodoridis
  • Vassilis J. Tsotras
Part of the Advances in Database Systems book series (ADBS, volume 17)

Abstract

A major performance goal of a DBMS is to minimize the number of I/O’s (i.e., blocks or pages transferred) between the disk and main memory. One way to achieve this goal is to minimize the number of I/O’s when answering a query. Note that many queries reference only a small portion of the records in a database file. For example the query: “find the employees who reside in Santa Monica” references only a fraction of the records in the Employee relation. It would be very inefficient to have the database system sequentially read all the pages of the Employee file and check the residence field of each employee record for the name “Santa Monica”. Instead the system should be able to locate the pages with “Santa Monica” employee records directly. To allow such fast access additional data structures called access methods are designed per database file. There are two fundamental access methods, namely indexing and hashing. The most widely used indexing scheme is the B+-tree. Hashing is also common, in particular in its Extendible and Linear Hashing schemes. We also describe two multi-attribute access methods, the k-d tree and the Grid File. Finally, we discuss an approach that is popular for document searching, the Inverted File.

Keywords

Range Query Query Time Access Method Local Depth Membership Query 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yannis Manolopoulos
    • 1
  • Yannis Theodoridis
    • 2
  • Vassilis J. Tsotras
    • 3
  1. 1.Aristotle UniversityGreece
  2. 2.Greece
  3. 3.University of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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