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Humanistic and Experiential Theories of Personality

  • Jeanne C. Watson
  • Leslie S. Greenberg
Part of the The Plenum Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Personality has been defined as the state of being a person, possessing traits or character. Alternatively, it is said to refer to the physiological, intellectual, emotional, and physical characteristics of the individual, especially those that are seen by others. Humanistic theories of personality include person-centered gestalt, and existential approaches. While each of these schools of thought is quite distinctive in many ways, there are a number of fundamental epistemological and ontological assumptions that they share that characterize them as humanistic. These are first (a) the emphasis on subjectivity and (b) the emphasis on people as self-reflective agents (Heidegger, 1962; Jaspers, 1963; Perls, 1973; Polster & Polster, 1973; Rice & Greenberg, 1992; Rogers, 1965; Schneider & May, 1995; Taylor, 1975; Tiryakian, 1962).

Keywords

Experiential Theory Dysfunctional Behavior Primary Emotion Ontological Assumption Healthy Functioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeanne C. Watson
    • 1
  • Leslie S. Greenberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Departmentof Applied PsychologyThe Ontario Institute for Studies in EducationTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyYork University NorthYorkCanada

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