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Personality Disorders

  • Thomas A. Widiger
Part of the The Plenum Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Personality traits are one's characteristic manner of thinking, feeling, perceiving, and/or relating to others across a wide range of situations that have been evident since late childhood or adolescence. Personality is the way one normally or typically behaves. It is what we mean when we describe our selves and each other. It includes that which is unique about us and that we share with others.

Keywords

Borderline Personality Disorder Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Personality Disorder Diagnosis Schizotypal Personality Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas A. Widiger
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA

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