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Design Languages and Learning Design

  • Gráinne Conole
Chapter
Part of the Explorations in the Learning Sciences, Instructional Systems and Performance Technologies book series (LSIS, volume 4)

Abstract

This chapter provides a definition for the term ‘design language’ and provides examples of how it is used in other professional domains. It summarises the research on design languages and considers how this relates to the notion of a learning design language. It argues that design is a key feature of many professions and considers design practices in three disciplines, music, architecture and chemistry, and describes how design approaches have been developed in each of these. It then summarises some of the key characteristics of design practice that emerge and explores the implications of these in terms of the application of design principles to an educational context.

Keywords

Learning Activity Visual Representation Instructional Design Social Networking Site Design Representation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gráinne Conole
    • 1
  1. 1.Beyond Distance Research AllianceUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK

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