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  • Gráinne Conole
Chapter
Part of the Explorations in the Learning Sciences, Instructional Systems and Performance Technologies book series (LSIS, volume 4)

Abstract

This chapter describes a number of research fields that are closely related to learning design and discusses how they have been used as a means of promoting more effective teaching practices. This chapter looks explicitly at the ways in which learning and teaching innovations have been promoted and supported. It considers the strategies that have been used to scaffold teaching practice to ensure effective use of good pedagogy and to promote innovative use of new technologies. The approaches to supporting teacher practice discussed in this chapter are instructional design, the learning sciences, learning objects and open educational resources, pedagogical patterns, and professional networks and support centres.

Keywords

Instructional Design Learning Science Support Centre Pattern Language Open Educational Resource 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gráinne Conole
    • 1
  1. 1.Beyond Distance Research AllianceUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK

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