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Abstract

As I indicated in the first chapter, I adopted an open approach to writing this book, by posting draft chapters online on Cloudworks and my blog. Periodically, I invited the broader research community (via Twitter and Facebook) to comment on them. In this postscript, I want to reflect on this experience and consider the ways in which adopting such open practices might change the nature of academic discourse and scholarship in the future. I felt it was important to practice what I preach, given that a central theme of this book is about adopting open practices in learning, teaching and research. I wanted to share draft chapters I produced and also reflections on writing the book as I went along. This postscript summarises my experience and reflections.

Keywords

Open Approach Academic Discourse Open Practice Conference Presentation Research Idea 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gráinne Conole
    • 1
  1. 1.Beyond Distance Research AllianceUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK

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