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Down the Labrador: Ramah Chert Use at Phillip’s Garden, Port au Choix

  • Robert J. Anstey
  • M. A. P. Renouf
Chapter
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

This chapter presents an analysis of Ramah chert tools and debitage from the Dorset Palaeoeskimo site of Phillip’s Garden (EeBi-1). Although the presence of Ramah chert at this site has long been acknowledged (Anstey 2008; Bell and Renouf 2008; Kennett 1985; Renouf 1986), details of temporal, technological and social dynamics of Ramah chert use at the site have not been examined. These dynamics of Ramah chert use are addressed in three ways. First, based on a sample of six dwelling assemblages we describe the temporal patterns of Ramah chert use at Phillip’s Garden. Second, we describe Ramah chert reduction practices at the site. Third, we discuss the implications of our results for understanding the social dynamics at Phillip’s Garden and between Dorset populations in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Keywords

Late Phase Exchange Network Social Dynamic Residential Mobility Middle Phase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Multi-year funding for the Northern Peninsula Archaeology and Landscape History Project, of which the Port au Choix Archaeology Project is a part, has been provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the National Science and Engineering Research Council, NSERC, Parks Canada, the Canada Research Chairs Program, Memorial University and the Provincial Archaeology Office. Charles Conway, Memorial University Geography Department, drafted the map. We would also like to thank John Erwin, Dominique Lavers, Stephen Loring and Patricia Wells for their helpful and insightful comments on earlier drafts of this paper.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologyMemorial UniversitySt. John’sCanada

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