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The Archaeology of Israel and Palestine

  • David B. Small
Chapter

Abstract

The geographical scope of this review includes modern Israel, and the lands of the Palestinian authority, including Gaza. The archaeology of each of these current geopolitical areas is so intertwined that we cannot separate one from the other without reducing drastically our understanding of the whole. This overview will address the issues of different periods in the history of this region’s archaeology as well as the character of its archaeology. The scope of this chapter cannot be as complete as a major synthesis of the archaeology of the region. Readers who would wish to read much more comprehensive overviews are strongly encouraged to turn to Ben-Tor’s The Archaeology of Israel (1993), Stern’s massive four volume, The New Encyclopedia of Archaeological Excavations in the Holy Land (1993), or Richards more recent, Near Eastern Archaeology, A Reader (2003).

Keywords

Palestinian Authority Roman Emperor Hellenistic Period Mandate Period Chalcolithic Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA

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