Physically Active Living for Individuals with ASD

  • Kerri L. Staples
  • Greg Reid
  • Kyle Pushkarenko
  • Susan Crawford
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of educational interventions for individuals with autism and pervasive developmental disorders with respect to learning and performing functional movement skills that span play, recreation, and physical education settings. Active living is a philosophy that places specific emphasis on empowering individuals to lead active and healthy lifestyles by gaining the requisite movement skills and knowledge needed to promote lifelong participation and meaningful involvement in physical activity. Research examining the movement skills of preschool and school-aged children with ASD compared to their typically developing peers suggests performance differences and likely deficits, with such differences increasing with age and skill complexity. As such, educational intervention should specifically target the development of movement skills and encourage physical activity among school-aged children with ASD, which in turn has associated health benefits. The final section will examine current approaches to educational intervention (e.g., ABA, TEACCH, Pivotal Response Training) and additional instructional strategies that facilitate the acquisition of movement skills in physical education and encourage active living. ABA and TEACCH have had some influence on evidence-based practice in physical activity. PRT, which essentially incorporates ABA and TEACCH strategies in natural settings, has received less attention to date. Nonetheless, this overview demonstrates that key strategies emanating from three education-based intervention models can be used to promote movement skill acquisition and ultimately support the successful inclusion of children and youth with ASD in achieving a physically active lifestyle.

Keywords

Osteoporosis Asphalt Kelly Fenton Banner 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kerri L. Staples
    • 1
  • Greg Reid
    • 2
  • Kyle Pushkarenko
    • 3
  • Susan Crawford
    • 4
  1. 1.Faculty of Kinesiology and Health StudiesUniversity of ReginaReginaCanada
  2. 2.Department of Kinesiology and Physical EducationMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  3. 3.Department of Kinesiology, Division of ScienceMedicine Hat CollegeMedicine HatCanada
  4. 4.Department of EducationUniversity College CorkCorkIreland

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