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Orthopedic Complications

  • I. W. FongEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Emerging Infectious Diseases of the 21st Century book series (EIDC)

Abstract

An orthopedic surgeon performed an elective second metatarsal wedge osteotomy (day surgery procedure) on a middle-aged healthy female for recurrent painful plantar callus. Pre-operative counseling was provided, including mention of uncommon possible complications of swelling and infection that may delay healing but “can always be corrected with a few days of appropriate antibiotics.” The procedure was performed without any obvious complications. However, 1 day post-operatively, the patient called the surgeon complaining of intense pain in the foot. Over the phone, the surgeon advised cutting the bandage and elevating the foot. On the fourth day, the patient called the office again complaining of worsening, intense pain, redness and swelling of her foot, and hot and cold spells.

Keywords

Septic Arthritis Medical Malpractice Hospital Emergency Department Substandard Care Bacterial Arthritis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.St. Michael’s HospitalUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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