Alcohol, Nicotine and Caffeine

Chapter

Abstract

The four authors cited above, writing about society’s favorite substances, have some interesting back stories. Pasteur, of course, was not a physician and instead was an industrial chemist involved in France’s alcohol industry of his time, and the partial heat sterilization technique we call pasteurization and use to make milk safe to drink was originally used to prevent spoilage of beer and wine [4]. Freneau was an American polemicist, nationalist and editor of a newspaper The National Gazette, which published the works of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison; the story of his antipathy to smoking, a socially accepted habit at the time, is unknown, at least by me. After all, it would be a century and a half before we would connect smoking and lung cancer. Bennett A. Weinberg, Ph.D., lead author of the book on caffeine, is a consultant in pharmaceutical communications serving leading industrial companies; he and co-author Bonnie Bealer quickly followed their successful 2001 book with another in 2002 titled The Caffeine Advantage: How to Sharpen Your Mind, Improve Your Physical Performance, and Achieve Your Goals – The Healthy Way [5].

Keywords

Placebo Dementia Nicotine Schizophrenia Tuberculosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Family Medicine School of MedicineOregon Health & Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA

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