School-Based Interventions for Anxiety in Youth

  • Aleta Angelosante
  • Daniela Colognori
  • Clark R. Goldstein
  • Carrie Masia Warner
Chapter

Abstract

Anxiety disorders are a costly problem, accounting for approximately 31% of health care costs in the United States (Rice & Miller, 1993). This expense, in part, is due to the high prevalence of these disorders (Costello & Angold, 1995; Klein & Pine, 2002), and their associated immediate and long-term impairment. Anxiety disorders can cause substantial distress and interfere with school performance, family interactions, and social functioning (Ialongo, Edelsohn, Werthamer-Larsson, Crockett, & Kellam, 1995; Langley, Bergman, McCracken, & Piacentini, 2004). In addition to having an early onset, anxiety disorders are associated with a chronic or fluctuating course into adulthood if left untreated (Achenbach, Howell, McConaughy, & Stanger, 1995; Costello & Angold, 1995; Ferdinand & Verhulst, 1995; Pine, Cohen, Gurley, Brook, & Ma, 1998). Childhood anxiety disorders predict risk for mood and anxiety disorders at later ages (Cole, Peeke, Martin, Truglio, & Seroczynski, 1998; Regier & Robins, 1991), and are associated with suicide attempts and psychiatric hospitalization (Ferdinand & Verhulst, 1995; Klein, 1995; Pine et al., 1998), highlighting the importance of intervening early and effectively.

Keywords

Depression Transportation Expense Stein Erwin 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aleta Angelosante
  • Daniela Colognori
  • Clark R. Goldstein
  • Carrie Masia Warner
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Child and Adolescent PsychiatryNew York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric ResearchNew YorkUSA

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