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Women’s Employment and EITC Expansion

Chapter
Part of the International Series on Consumer Science book series (ISCS)

Abstract

This chapter examines women’s employment and expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) program. Section 4.2 highlights changes in women’s labor force participation since the 1970s in light of marital status, presence of children, and presence of very young children; namely, those 3 years of age or younger. The increasing proportions of such mothers in the labor force suggested that working mothers had become the norm and that government efforts should be directed at assisting nonworking mothers in such a way as to increase and sustain their labor force attachment. This sociodemographic and normative backdrop undergirded discussions of welfare reform in the 1990s, the subject of Chap.  3, and of expanding the EITC program, a subject of this chapter.

Keywords

Labor Force Participation Labor Force Participation Rate Internal Revenue Service Separate Woman Female Labor Force Participant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wurzweiler School of Social WorkYeshiva UniversityNew YorkUSA

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