Evidence-Based Treatment of Behavioral Excesses and Deficits for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Michael D. Powers
  • Mark J. Palmieri
  • Kristen S. D’Eramo
  • Kristen M. Powers
Chapter

Abstract

The practice of evidence-based treatment of challenging behavior in autism has been heavily influenced by the application of principles and practices based on the experimental analysis of behavior, and particularly applied behavior analysis, to deficits or excesses in the behavioral repertoire of individuals with autism, Asperger Syndrome, and related pervasive developmental disorders. Indeed, for over 50 years, the learning principles established by Skinner (1938, 1953) and others have guided both the assessment and intervention process, evolving systematically as new findings are published and replicated.

Keywords

Melatonin Metaphor Narcolepsy Nevin 

Abbreviations

ADHD

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

ASDs

Autism spectrum disorders

DRA

Differential reinforcement of alternative behavior

FCT

Functional communication training

High-p

High-probability request

Low-p

Low-probability request

NCR

Noncontingent reinforcement

SIB

Self-injurious behavior

SSED

Single subject experimental design

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael D. Powers
    • 1
  • Mark J. Palmieri
    • 2
  • Kristen S. D’Eramo
    • 2
  • Kristen M. Powers
    • 2
  1. 1.Yale Child Study CenterYale School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.The Center for Children with Special NeedsGlastonburyUSA

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