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Assessing Cause–Effect Relationships in Environmental Accidents: Harlequin Ducks and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill

  • John A. Wiens
  • Robert H. Day
  • Stephen M. Murphy
  • Mark A. Fraker
Chapter
Part of the Current Ornithology book series (CUOR, volume 17)

Abstract

Over the past several decades, scientists, resource managers, politicians, policy makers, and the general public have all become increasingly aware of the magnitude and complexity of environmental problems resulting from human activities. Assessing the ecological consequences of environmental disruptions such as habitat fragmentation, timber harvesting, or the release of pollutants into the environment has become the focus of entire disciplines. In all of these fields, the development of remediation, mitigation, or management strategies ultimately rests on assessing cause–effect relationships.

Keywords

Blue Mussel Environmental Disruption Habitat Occupancy Spill Effect Environmental Accident 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Many individuals have contributed to this synthesis. Alan Maki, Alan Mut, Keith Parker, and a large number of ABR personnel assisted in field work and data management. Allison Zusi-Cobb prepared GIS graphics. Charles (Rick) Johnson assisted in field work and contributed insights gained from his work on sea otters. Joint field work with Dan Rosenberg in 1996 provided fresh perspectives on Harlequin Duck ecology. This work was initiated while JAW was associated with Colorado State University, and preparation of the manuscript was facilitated while JAW was a Sabbatical Fellow at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, a Center funded by NSF (Grant # DEB-0072909), the University of California, and UC Santa Barbara. Development of the manuscript continued while JAW was a Lead Scientist with The Nature Conservancy. We thank all of these individuals and organizations. Our research was funded by Exxon Company, USA, and by ExxonMobil Corporation; however, the conclusions are our own and do not necessarily represent those of ExxonMobil.

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Copyright information

© Springer New York 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. Wiens
    • 1
  • Robert H. Day
  • Stephen M. Murphy
  • Mark A. Fraker
  1. 1.PRBO Conservation SciencePetalumaUSA

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