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Harold W. Kuhn

Chapter
Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR, volume 147)

Abstract

Shortly after WorldWar II, many college mathematics students pursuing their educational programs had no way of knowing that a new, mathematically based applied field, Operations Research (OR), had originated from the exigencies of military planning and operations. OR did not enter college curricula until the mid-1950s, and then, only rarely in mathematics departments. Occasionally, through mainly fortuitous circumstances, mathematical problems that were to have a significant impact on OR were brought to the attention of a select group of such students. Remarkable mathematical, computational, and applied advances resulted from this early exposure. One of the most influential of this new generation of mathematical researchers was Harold W. Kuhn.

Keywords

Assignment Problem Pure Strategy Extensive Form Bryn Mawr Naval Research Logistics 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  2. 2.Naval Postgraduate SchoolMontereyUSA

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