How Governments and Other Funding Sources Can Facilitate Self-Help Research and Services

  • Crystal R. Blyler
  • Risa Fox
  • Neal B. Brown

Abstract

Despite the inherent grassroots nature of self-help, there is much that governments and other funding sources can do to facilitate the development and provision of self-help services and research. Through persistent attention to self-help concepts, provision of resources, and attention to emerging trends that might provide future opportunities, governments and other funders can be valuable partners for pushing the field of self-help research and services in new directions. This chapter provides examples of the types of activities in which governments and other funding sources can engage to facilitate and support self-help research and services. A number of ideas regarding potential sources of funding for self-help researchers and service providers are presented and future directions for self-help research and services are discussed. By supporting self-help on the national stage, we believe that the efforts of the federal Community Support Program has contributed to the growth of self-help over the past 30 years.

Keywords

Transportation Income Expense Arena 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Crystal R. Blyler
    • 1
  • Risa Fox
    • 1
  • Neal B. Brown
    • 2
  1. 1.SAMHSA Center for Mental Health ServicesRockvilleUSA
  2. 2.Community Support Programs BranchSAMHSA Center for Mental Health ServicesRockvilleUSA

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