Advertisement

Spectrum Sharing in DS-CDMA/OFDM Wireless Mobile Networks

  • Keivan Navaie
  • Halim Yanikomeroglu
  • Mohammad G. Khoshkholgh
  • Ahmad R. Sharafat
  • Hamidreza Nikoofar
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we define DS-CDMA/OFDM spectrum sharing systems and investigate the impact of the primary service communication activity as well as other system parameters on the interference level at the secondary service receiver. The achieved capacity of the secondary service is directly related to the interference level at the secondary service receiver as well as the secondary service adopted sub-channel selection policy. The achievable capacity of the secondary service in such systems is obtained under different sub-channel selection policies in fading environments. Two general sub-channel selection policies are studied in this chapter: uniform sub-channel selection and non-uniform sub-channel selection. Uniform sub-channel selection fits into the cases where a priori knowledge on sub-channels state information is not available at the secondary transmitter. For cases with available a priori knowledge on sub-channels state information, a variety of non-uniform sub-channel selection policies are studied. We then present results on the scaling law of the opportunistic spectrum sharing in DS-CDMA/OFDM systems with multiple users. We provide numerical results to compare different sub-channel selection policies.

Keywords

Primary User Secondary User Spectral Efficiency Primary Receiver Secondary Transmitter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Part of the work presented in this chapter was supported by the Mobile Communication Company of Iran (MCI).

References

  1. 1.
    Peha J. M: Approaches to spectrum sharing. IEEE Communications Magazine 43, 10–12 (2005)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Haykin S.: Cognitive radio: Brain-empowered wireless communications. IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications 23, 201–220 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Zhao O., Sadler B. M.: A survey of dynamic spectrum access: Signal processing, networking, and regulatory policy. IEEE Signal Processing Magazine 24, 79–89 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Khoshkholgh M. G., Navaie K., Yanikomeroglu H.: Impact of the secondary service transmit power constraint on the achievable capacity of spectrum sharing in Rayleigh fading environment. IEEE Communications Letters 12, 865–867 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Khoshkholgh M. G., Navaie K., Yanikomeroglu H.: On the impact of the primary network activity on the achievable capacity of spectrum sharing over fading channels. IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications 8, 2100–2111 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Khoshkholgh M. G., Navaie K., Yanikomeroglu H.: Adaptive multiple time-scale power allocation for spectrum sharing DS-CDMA Networks. Proc. IEEE ICC CogNet’08, Beijing, China, 466–470 (2008)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Viterbi, A. J: CDMA: Principles of Spread Spectrum Communication. Addison-Wesley, Reading Mass (1995)MATHGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Gastpar M.: On capacity under receive and spatial spectrum-sharing constraints. IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 53, 471–487 (2007)MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Jafar S. A., Srinivasa S.: Capacity limits of cognitive radio with distributed and dynamic spectral activity. IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications 25, 529–537 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ghasemi A., Sousa E. S.: Fundamental limits of spectrum-sharing in fading environments. IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications 6, 649–658 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Zhang L., Liang Y. C., Xin Y.: Joint beamforming and power allocation for multiple access channels in cognitive radio networks. IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications 26, 38–51 (2008)MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Zhang H. Su, X.: Cross-layer based opportunistic MAC protocols for QoS provisionings over cognitive radio wireless networks. IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications 26, 118–129 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Geirhofer S., Tong L., Sadler L.: Cognitive medium access: Constraining interference based on experimental models. IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications 26, 95–105 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Navaie K., Valaee S., Sharafat A. R., Sousa E. S.: On the downlink interference in heterogeneous wireless DS-CDMA networks. IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications 5, 384–393 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Sharma M., Sahoo A., Nayak K. D.: Channel selection under interference temperature model in multi-hop cognitive mesh networks. Proc. IEEE DySPAN’07, Dublin, Ireland, 133–136 (2007)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Nie N., Comaniciu C.: Adaptive channel allocation spectrum etiquette for cognitive radio networks. Proc. IEEE DySPAN’05, Baltimore, MD, 331–335 (2005)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Tse D., Viswanath P.: Fundamentals of Wireless Communication. Cambridge University Press, New York, NY (2004)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Khoshkholgh M. G., Navaie K., Yanikomeroglu H.: Achievable capacity in hybrid DS-CDMA/OFDM spectrum-sharing. IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing 9, 756–777 (2010)Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Holma H., Toskala A.: WCDMA for UMTS: Radio Access for Third Generation Mobile Communications. Wiley, New York, NY (2000)Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Goldsmith A. J.: Wireless Communications. Cambridge University Press, New York, NY (2005)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Cover T. M., Thomas J. A.: Elements of Information Theory. Wiley, Hoboken, NJ (2006)MATHGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Gupta P., Kumar P. R.: The capacity of wireless networks. IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 46, 388–404 (2000)MathSciNetMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Grossglauser M., Tse D. N. C.: Mobility increases the capacity of ad hoc wireless networks. IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking 10, 477–486 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keivan Navaie
    • 1
  • Halim Yanikomeroglu
    • 2
  • Mohammad G. Khoshkholgh
    • 3
  • Ahmad R. Sharafat
    • 3
  • Hamidreza Nikoofar
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Electronic & Electrical EngineeringUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK
  2. 2.Department of Systems and Computer EngineeringBroadband Communications and Wireless Systems (BCWS) Centre, Carleton UniversityOttawaCanada
  3. 3.Wireless Innovation Laboratory (WIL), Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringTarbiat Modares UniversityTehranIran
  4. 4.Mobile Communication Company of Iran (MCI)TehranIran

Personalised recommendations