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Traffic Simulation with MITSIMLab

  • Moshe Ben-AkivaEmail author
  • Haris N. Koutsopoulos
  • Tomer Toledo
  • Qi Yang
  • Charisma F. Choudhury
  • Constantinos Antoniou
  • Ramachandran Balakrishna
Chapter
Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR, volume 145)

Abstract

MITSIMLab (MIcroscopic Traffic SIMulation Laboratory) is a microscopic traffic simulation model that evaluates the impacts of alternative traffic management system designs at the operational level and assists in their subsequent refinement. MITSIMLab models the travel and driving behavior of individual vehicles, the detailed movement of transit vehicles, and the various control and information provision strategies through a generic controller. A calibration methodology for important parameters and inputs was also developed. The model has been extended to address the special driving behavior evidenced in urban networks and has been used as a test bed for the evaluation of advanced traveler information systems (ATIS). Calibration and validation results from networks in the United States and Europe are discussed.

Keywords

Route Choice Lane Change Link Travel Time Simultaneous Perturbation Stochastic Approximation Lead Vehicle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Moshe Ben-Akiva
    • 1
    Email author
  • Haris N. Koutsopoulos
    • 2
  • Tomer Toledo
    • 3
  • Qi Yang
    • 4
  • Charisma F. Choudhury
    • 5
  • Constantinos Antoniou
    • 6
  • Ramachandran Balakrishna
    • 7
  1. 1.Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.The Royal Institute of TechnologyStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Technion – Israel Institute of TechnologyHaifaIsrael
  4. 4.Caliper CorporationNewtonUSA
  5. 5.Bangladesh University of Engineering and TechnologyDhaka-1000Bangladesh
  6. 6.National Technical University of AthensAthensGreece
  7. 7.Caliper CorporationNewtonUSA

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