Prevalence and Associated Conditions

Chapter
Part of the Developmental Psychopathology at School book series (DPS)

Abstract

This chapter explores the prevalence rates of NSSI in youth. Additionally, a review of psychiatric conditions frequently associated with NSSI is provided, including suicide, mood and anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, hostility/anger, eating disorders, dissociative disorders, and borderline personality disorder.

Keywords

Burning Depression Covariance Turkey Triad 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University at Albany State University of New YorkAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation, School Psychology and Deaf StudiesCalifornia State UniversitySacramentoUSA

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