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Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Aging of Osteoarthritis

  • Crisostomo BialogEmail author
  • Anthony M. Reginato
Chapter
  • 1.1k Downloads

Abstract

Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent joint disease in the elderly population. In this chapter, the authors discuss the classification criteria and the modifiable and non-­modifiable risk factors for osteoarthritis. The relationship between age-associated changes in the musculoskeletal system and the development of osteoarthritis is also explained.

Keywords

Osteoarthritis Classification Elderly Risk factors Epidemiology 

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA

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