Conductive Adhesive Joint Reliability

  • Johan Liu
  • Olli Salmela
  • Jussi Särkkä
  • James E. Morris
  • Per-Erik Tegehall
  • Cristina Andersson
Chapter

Abstract

There are two primary categories of electrically conductive adhesive (ECA): isotropic conductive adhesive (ICA) and anisotropic conductive adhesive (ACA), where ACAs are available as paste (ACP) or film (ACF). Both types conduct through metal filler particles in an adhesive polymer matrix.

This chapter presents an overview of the current status of understanding of conductive adhesives in various electronic packaging applications and of some fundamental issues relevant to their continuing development. It is organized with initial discussions of basic ECA concepts of structure-related properties, and how these are affected by material selection and processing, followed by general properties and reliability considerations.

Keywords

Fatigue Nickel Hydrolysis Migration Anisotropy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johan Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Olli Salmela
    • 3
  • Jussi Särkkä
    • 4
  • James E. Morris
    • 5
  • Per-Erik Tegehall
    • 6
  • Cristina Andersson
    • 7
  1. 1.SMIT Center and Bionano Systems Laboratory Department of Microtechnology and NanoscienceChalmers University of TechnologyGöteborgSweden
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of New Displays and System Integration SMIT Center and School of Mechatronics and Mechanical EngineeringShanghai UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Nokia Siemens NetworksEspooFinland
  4. 4.Nokia Siemens NetworksOuluFinland
  5. 5.Department of Electrical & Computer EngineeringPortland State UniversityPortlandUSA
  6. 6.Swerea IVFMölndalSweden
  7. 7.Department of Microtechnology and NanoscienceChalmers University of TechnologyGöteborgSweden

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