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Interventions in the Context of the Distressed (Type D) Personality

  • Aline J. Pelle
  • Krista C. van den Broek
  • Johan Denollet

Abstract

The distressed (Type D) personality is characterized by a general propensity to psychological distress, defined by the combination of high negative affectivity and social inhibition. Across cardiac conditions, Type D patients are at increased risk for impaired health outcomes, including increased morbidity and mortality, and impaired mood and health status. Further, Type Ds are likely to display poor health-related behaviors and are characterized by impaired social functioning. In this chapter, a general introduction on the background, assessment, and clinical relevance of Type D personality is provided. Building on existing evidence, interventions for improving mood and health status, health-related behaviors, and interpersonal functioning in the context of Type D personality are discussed. Finally, practical guidelines for clinicians in the context of Type D personality are provided and suggestions for future work are presented.

Keywords

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Chronic Heart Failure Emotional Distress Cardiac Rehabilitation Cardiac Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

CABG

Coronary artery bypass grafting

CAD

Coronary artery disease

CBT

Cognitive behavioral therapy

CHF

Chronic heart failure

CREATE

Canadian cardiac randomized evaluation of antidepressant and ­psychotherapy efficacy

DS14

Type D questionnaire

ENRICHD

ENhancing recovery in coronary heart disease

EPC

Endothelial progenitor cells

EXIT

EXhaustion Intervention Trial

HPA

Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal

ICD

Implantable cardioverter defibrillator

IPT

Interpersonal therapy

MBCT

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy

MI

Myocardial infarction

NIH

National Institutes of Health

PAD

Peripheral arterial disease

PCI

Percutaneous coronary intervention

RCT

Randomized controlled trial

SEARCH

Support, Education, and Research in Chronic Heart Failure Study

SPIRR-CAD

Stepwise psychotherapy intervention for reducing risk in coronary artery disease

SSRI

Selective serotonin receptor inhibitor

STEP-AMI

Short-term psychotherapy in acute myocardial infarction

TNF

Tumor necrosis factor

WEBCARE

WEB-based distress management program for implantable CARdioverter dEfibrillator patients

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aline J. Pelle
    • 1
  • Krista C. van den Broek
    • 1
  • Johan Denollet
    • 1
  1. 1.Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic diseasesTilburg UniversityTilburgThe Netherlands

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