Current and Future Treatment Guidelines for HIV

Chapter

Abstract

Combination antiretroviral therapy (CART), consisting of 3 drugs with at least two different viral targets, has changed HIV/AIDS from an invariably lethal disease to a manageable one [1]. As potent antiretroviral combination therapy has improved the disease-free survival of HIV-infected individuals, adding millions of years of additional life to those receiving these drugs [2].

Keywords

Hepatitis Tuberculosis Flare Interferon Lamivudine 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Medicine/Division of Infectious DiseasesUniversity of Cincinnati College of MedicineCincinnatiUSA

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