Emergence and Development of the Psychology of Women

  • Alexandra Rutherford
  • Leeat Granek
Chapter

Keywords

Depression Europe Posit Antimony Crest 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandra Rutherford
    • 1
  • Leeat Granek
    • 2
  1. 1.York UniversityTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Princess Margaret Hospital and Sunnybrook Odette Cancer CentreTorontoCanada

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