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Children

  • Mary Ashton Phillips
  • Alan M. GrossEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The diagnostic interview is often the first step in the process of diagnosis and treatment of a client. The goal of a diagnostic interview is to gather relevant information pertaining to the client’s problem. Additionally, the diagnostic interview sets the stage for building rapport with the client, and giving the client a way to conceptualize the diagnostic and treatment process. Approaching a diagnostic interview with sensitivity and careful planning is of paramount importance. This is especially so when working with children. Unlike adult populations, a variety of factors particular to children and their development must be considered when assessing them. This chapter serves to outline these considerations for children, including the importance of the development process, guidelines for interviewing, a look at several recommended diagnostic interviews, and a case study to illustrate.

Keywords

Problem Behavior Eating Disorder Diagnostic Interview Oppositional Defiant Disorder Semistructured Interview 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MississippiUniversityUSA

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