Age-Related Changes in the Trachea in Healthy Adults

  • Hiroaki Sakai
  • Yasutaka Nakano
  • Shigeo Muro
  • Toyohiro Hirai
  • Yasutaka Takubo
  • Yoshitaka Oku
  • Hiroshi Hamakawa
  • Ayuko Takahashi
  • Toshihiko Sato
  • Fengshi Chen
  • Hisashi Sahara
  • Takuji Fujinaga
  • Kiyoshi Sato
  • Makoto Sonobe
  • Tsuyoshi Shoji
  • Ryo Miyahara
  • Kenichi Okubo
  • Toru Bando
  • Toshiki Hirata
  • Hiroshi Date
  • Michiaki Mishima
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 662)

Abstract

To investigate age-related changes in the shape of trachea, normal male volunteers (n = 83, mean ± SD: 47.7 ± 20.2 years old) underwent inspiratory CT scans at full inspiration and lung function tests. Subjects who showed VC < 80% predicted or FEV1 < 80% predicted on lung function tests were excluded. The CT data, which is located at 2.0 cm above the aortic arch, were transferred to a personal computer. The tracheal area (St) and two parameters, Tracheal index (Ti) and Circularity (Ci) indicating the shape of the trachea, were automatically calculated. Ti was defined the ratio of the coronal to the sagittal diameter of the trachea, and the Ci (Ci = 4πS/L2, S: tracheal area, L: tracheal perimeter) was used to indicate the roundness of the trachea. A Ci value of less than 1 indicated the distortion of the roundness. Both St and St/BSA (body surface area) showed a significant correlation with age (r = 0.37, r = 0.52; p = 0.0006, p < 0.0001). Ti was not correlated with age (r = −0.20; p = 0.0697), whereas Ci was significantly correlated with age (r = −0.32; p = 0.00364). There were measurable age related changes of the trachea both in the area and the shape. Aging results in the increased tracheal area and a distortion of the roundness.

Keywords

Helium Carbon Monoxide Cough Papain 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Arnab Majumdar of the Department of Physics, Boston University for helpful advice and manuscript editing.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroaki Sakai
    • 1
  • Yasutaka Nakano
    • 2
  • Shigeo Muro
    • 3
  • Toyohiro Hirai
    • 3
  • Yasutaka Takubo
    • 4
  • Yoshitaka Oku
    • 5
  • Hiroshi Hamakawa
    • 6
  • Ayuko Takahashi
    • 7
  • Toshihiko Sato
    • 8
  • Fengshi Chen
    • 7
  • Hisashi Sahara
    • 9
  • Takuji Fujinaga
    • 7
  • Kiyoshi Sato
    • 9
  • Makoto Sonobe
    • 9
  • Tsuyoshi Shoji
    • 10
  • Ryo Miyahara
    • 9
  • Kenichi Okubo
    • 9
  • Toru Bando
    • 7
  • Toshiki Hirata
    • 9
  • Hiroshi Date
    • 11
  • Michiaki Mishima
    • 12
  1. 1.Departments of Thoracic Surgery, Institute for Frontier Medical SciencesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of MedicineShiga University of Medical ScienceOtsuJapan
  3. 3.Departments of Respiratory Medicine, Institute for Frontier Medical SciencesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  4. 4.Hamamatsu Rosai HospitalHamamatsuJapan
  5. 5.Department of PhysiologyHyogo college of medicineNishinomiyaJapan
  6. 6.Departments of Organ Preservation Technology, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Graduate School of MedicineInstitute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  7. 7.Departments of Organ Preservation Technology, Graduate School of MedicineInstitute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  8. 8.Department of Bioartificial organs, Institute for Frontier Medical SciencesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  9. 9.Departments of Thoracic Surgery, Institute for Frontier Medical SciencesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  10. 10.Department of Thoracic SurgeryKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  11. 11.Department of Thoracic SurgeryKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  12. 12.Department of Respiratory MedicineKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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