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Can Domestically Seated War Crimes Tribunals Generate Positive Externalities? A Case Study of the Special Court for Sierra Leone

  • Christopher E. S. Warburton
  • Richard F. Culp
Chapter

Abstract

The establishment of the International Criminal Court and its recent efforts to address war crimes in ongoing conflicts present a case for discontinuing the practice of constituting ad hoc war crimes tribunals in countries that are recovering from civil conflict. This chapter argues that seating international criminal tribunals in the location of atrocities is capable of generating positive externalities that aid in overall post-conflict development. Using data from the Special Court for Sierra Leone, we estimate the marginal benefits of seating the hybrid court in Freetown, Sierra Leone, and report on the positive externalities that were generated for the country.

Keywords

International Criminal Court Shadow Price Positive Externality Transitional Justice International Criminal Tribunal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher E. S. Warburton
    • 1
  • Richard F. Culp
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsJohn Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, CUNYNew YorkUSA

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