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Commonly Used Excipients in Pharmaceutical Suspensions

  • R. Christian Moreton
Chapter

Abstract

The suspension must be physically stable (no appreciable settling) for a sufficient time, chemically stable over the required time (shelf-life), possess a viscosity that allows it to be used for its intended purpose, be easily reconstituted (redispersible) upon shaking, easy to manufacture and be acceptable in use to the patient, care-giver or other user. This chapter deals in-depth, with the role and selection of commonly used excipients in developing stable pharmaceutical suspension dosage forms.

Keywords

Disperse Phase Continuous Phase Microcrystalline Cellulose Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Magnesium Aluminum Silicate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© AAPS 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.FinnBrit ConsultingWalthamUSA

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