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Assessment of Social Skills and Intellectual Disability

  • Luc Lecavalier
  • Eric M. Butter
Chapter
Part of the ABCT Clinical Assessment Series book series (ABCT)

Abstract

Social skills foster healthy interpersonal relationships, promote independence, and are crucial to coping with stressful situations. Deficits in social skills are a critical component of intellectual disability (ID). They are related to many important personal and social outcomes in this population. In many ways, social skills are at the heart of controversies on how to define ID. As such, this chapter begins with an overview of the disability. Next, the relationship between ID and social skills is discussed in light of similar constructs, psychopathology, and genetic disorders. We then briefly elaborate on a few assessment considerations and modalities. Finally, we present an overview of selected adaptive behavior measures and rating scales. Instruments were chosen based on their widespread use, recent development, or unique features.

Keywords

Social Skill Down Syndrome Intellectual Disability Intellectual Disability Social Intelligence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luc Lecavalier
    • 1
  • Eric M. Butter
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyOhio State University, Nisonger Center, UCEDDColumbusUSA
  2. 2.College of Medicine, Developmental Assessment Program/Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders, Nationwide Children’s HospitalThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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