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Information as a Tool for Learning

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter sets the stage for the rest of the book by providing an overview of theories from information studies and instructional design and development that suggest the key role of information in learning. Reviewing definitions of information from both fields, the chapter shows how the views converge to present information as a network of entities and relationships that is dynamic, complex, multifaceted, and multipurpose. At its core, information consists of facts, concepts, procedures, and metacognitive strategies—the very things that constitute what we learn. Through learning, information is transferred from the environment into human cognitive systems to become the components of our internal knowledge. Drawing on contemporary understandings of learning as an active, self-directed, internal process by which humans make sense of the information we encounter, the chapter explores the parallels between today’s definitions of information and of learning to argue that information itself is our basic tool for authentic learning in the information age and that accessing, evaluating, and using information are the heart of twenty-first-century skills.

Keywords

Instructional Design Factual Knowledge Metacognitive Knowledge Metacognitive Strategy Internal Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Information Science and TechnologyDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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