Is the Third Way Possible for Peace? The Dilemma of National Identity in Taiwan and Beyond

  • Li- Li Huang
Chapter
Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li- Li Huang
    • 1
  1. 1.Ateneo de Manila UniversityPhilippines

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