Aggression and Noncompliance

Chapter

Abstract

Aggression and noncompliance are common problem behaviors displayed by some children with ASD. Aggression in the form of hitting, kicking, and biting can cause serious injury to peers and adults, creating an unsafe learning environment. Furthermore, aggressive behavior interferes with instruction and skill acquisition. The social consequences of chronic aggression also are untoward: the child is avoided, perceived unfavorably, and unlikely to establish friendships. Frequently, children who demonstrate serious aggression are enrolled in restrictive educational settings, sometimes exposed to invasive treatment procedures (e.g., punishment) or ineffective pharmacotherapy.

Like aggression, noncompliance has deleterious effects on learning. A child who has ASD and noncompliant behavior receives inconsistent instruction because she/he does not respond uniformly to requests from a teacher or parent. Noncompliance means that a child will not perform many appropriate behaviors that can be shaped and strengthened through positive reinforcement. Note too that caregivers usually have a poor opinion of children who “refuse” to carry out directions.

Keywords

Attenuation Fist 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.May InstituteRandolphUSA

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