Summary

Persona analysis provides a compelling method of focusing the requirements for any new product. The technique works best when it’s applied early in the project life cycle, because it tends to drive the requirements. On the mapplet project, the technique was applied early in release 2 (the first release being a prototype), and the result was that some useful requirements were identified that might otherwise have been missed.

Interaction design isn’t just about designing the “look” of a user interface. It’s also about designing the behavior—determining how the UI will behave and respond to user inputs. This is why interaction design and use cases work so well together, especially when combined with personas.

Keywords

Entropy Marketing Expense Alan ArcGIS 

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References

  1. 1.
    Jennifer Preece, Yvonne Rogers, and Helen Sharp, Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2002).Google Scholar
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    Alan Cooper, The Inmates Are Running the Asylum:Why High Tech Products Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity (Indianapolis, IN: Sams Publishing, 1999).Google Scholar
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    Alan Cooper and Robert Reimann, About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2003).Google Scholar
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    Karl E. Wiegers, Software Requirements, Second Edition (Redmond, WA: Microsoft Press, 2003).Google Scholar
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    Matt Stephens, “Interaction Design: Persona Power,” Software Development Magazine, March 2004.Google Scholar
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    Alistair Cockburn, Writing Effective Use Cases (New York: Addison-Wesley, 2000), (New York: Addison-Wesley, 2000).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Doug Rosenberg, Matt Stephens, and Mark Collins-Cope 2005

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