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Albita’s Queer Nations and U.S. Salsa Culture

  • Darshan Elena Campos

Abstract

Ripping off the cellophane wrap, forcing open the plastic case, I search for her. She sits, waiting, reclining in a wooden chair. She watches as I read her body. Her unwavering gaze shows an awareness of the ways in which bodies, women’s bodies in particular, are read by wandering eyes. Still, my eyes wander, mapping the contours of her body … I purchased Albita’s No se parece a nada (1995) because her aesthetic spoke to my desire for a lesbian presence in U.S. salsa culture. As her title indicates, No se parece a nada, she is like nothing I had ever encountered in hegemonic salsa culture, a field of cultural production and communal gathering that is heteronormative to the point of homophobia. Albita’s figuration of butchness on the compact disc’s front and back covers provided me—and my femme desire—with a place inside salsa’s rigid codes of gender and sexuality. The compact disc’s internal imagery revealed feminine markers—high heels and manicured fingernails—that further satisfied my desire for an archive of diverse sexual identities in U.S. salsa culture.

Keywords

Female Genital Mutilation Compact Disc Illegal Immigration Undocumented Immigrant Border Patrol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Neferti X. M. Tadiar and Angela Y. Davis 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Darshan Elena Campos

There are no affiliations available

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