How Mothers See Fathers

  • Allison Zippay
  • Anu Rangarajan

Abstract

Eager to promote involved fathers in the lives of families headed by unwed mothers, the 1996 welfare reform legislation strengthened paternity establishment and child support enforcement, and increased benefits for two-parent families (Kobell and Principe, 2002; Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act, 1996). Spurred in part by an economic motive to decrease welfare dependency among female-headed households, one of the goals of the legislation is “the formation and maintenance of two-parent families”

Keywords

Income Fishing Glean 

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Copyright information

© Jill Duerr Berrick and Bruce Fuller 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allison Zippay
  • Anu Rangarajan

There are no affiliations available

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