Effects on Children as Parents Transition from Welfare to Employment

  • Pamela A. Morris
  • Ellen K. Scott
  • Andrew S. London

Abstract

How can welfare and employment policies help families cope better as parents as they make the transition from welfare to employment? Our research addresses this question by integrating two very different, but complementary, lines of research—random assignment social experiments on the effects of welfare and employment programs on low-income adults and children, and longitudinal, qualitative interview studies of families who experienced the 1996 welfare-reform changes. Together, these studies point to the benefits for children of policies and programs that increase family income as they increase employment.

Keywords

Migration Depression Insurance Coverage Transportation Income 

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Copyright information

© Jill Duerr Berrick and Bruce Fuller 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pamela A. Morris
  • Ellen K. Scott
  • Andrew S. London

There are no affiliations available

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