First Weeks of a Memorable Summer

  • Sandra E. Adickes

Abstract

When we arrived at the Hattiesburg bus terminal in mid-afternoon, I telephoned the local COFO office to let the staff know of our arrival, and then called the COFO staff in Memphis to let them know we had arrived safely. Within minutes, Reverend Bob Beech, a volunteer with the Delta Ministry Project, arrived in a car to take us to Vernon Dahmer’s farm for a picnic, the first sign I had seen that day of an event honoring our nation’s independence. After months of soliciting funds, books, and other resources, and recruiting teachers, and planning curriculum—gripped at times with fear for my own and others’ safety—I was astonished by the happiness I witnessed and experienced at that picnic. The photos taken by the photographer Herbert Randall, who remained in Hattiesburg through the summer, reflect the explosive joy at this truly revolutionary celebration by the COFO workers, summer volunteers, and those members of the black community, young and old, who had joined the Movement.

Keywords

Dust Explosive Assure Turkey Gravel 

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Notes

  1. 7.
    Richard Wright, Black Boy (American Hunger): A Record of Childhood and Youth (1944 New York: Harper Collins, 1993), 3–8.Google Scholar
  2. 12.
    David Dennis, remarks recorded in transcript: “Freedom Summer Roundtable Symposium,” University of Southern Mississippi, 7 June 1999.Google Scholar
  3. 13.
    Sandy Leigh, quoted by Sheila Michaels, remarks recorded in transcript: “Freedom Summer Roundtable Symposium,” University of Southern Mississippi, 7 June 1999.Google Scholar
  4. 14.
    Staughton Lynd, quoted in Len Holt, The Summer That Didn’t End (New York: Morrow, 1965), 318.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Sandra E. Adickes 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra E. Adickes

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