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Hydrometeorology of Floods and Droughts in South Asia – A Brief Appraisal

  • S. NandargiEmail author
  • O. N. Dhar
  • M. M. Sheikh
  • Brenna Enright
  • M. Monirul Qader Mirza
Chapter
  • 635 Downloads

Abstract

Flooding is a common event in South Asia. In fact, it has been said that after Bangladesh, India is the worst flood affected country in the world (Agarwal and Narayan). It is possible for extreme floods to inundate up to approximately 10 million hectares or nearly 70 percent of Bangladesh. By contrast, about 40 million hectares or nearly 12.5 percent of India is flood prone. Different types and extents of flooding occur in different regions of the subcontinent.

Keywords

Monsoon Season United Nations Environment Program India Meteorological Department World Meteorological Organization Hydrological Drought 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Capital Publishing Company 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Nandargi
    • 1
    Email author
  • O. N. Dhar
    • 2
  • M. M. Sheikh
    • 3
  • Brenna Enright
    • 4
  • M. Monirul Qader Mirza
    • 5
  1. 1.Indian Institute of Tropical MeteorologyPashan PuneIndia
  2. 2.Indian Institute of Tropical MeteorologyPashan PuneIndia
  3. 3.Global Change Impact Studies Centre (GCISC) National Centre for Physics (NCP) ComplexQuaid-i-Azam University CampusIslamabadPakistan
  4. 4.Department of Civil EngineeringUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  5. 5.Adaptation and Impacts Research Division (AIRD) Environment Canada c/o Department of Physical and Environmental SciencesUniversity of Toronto at Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail TorontoTorontoCanada

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