Potential of Organic Resources as Plant Nutrients in India

The nutrient content of various organic resources having the total nutrient potential of 14.85 million tonnes was estimated in 2000, which would become around 16.34 and 32.41 million tonnes by 2010 and 2025, respectively. Out of these organic resources, considerable tapable potential of nutrients (N + P2O5 + K2O) from human excreta, livestock dung and crop residues has been worked out to the order of 5.05 million tonnes in 2000, which would be about 6.24 and 7.75 million tonnes by 2010 and 2025, respectively, for the required food grain production of the increased human population. However, use of all tapable nutrients would not be sufficient to produce the required food grains for the burgeoning human population. Thus, integrated use of the chemical, organic and biological sources of plant nutrients and their different management practices have a tremendous potential not only in sustaining agricultural productivity and soil health but also in meeting a part of chemical fertilizer requirement for different crops and cropping systems.

Keywords

Organic resources nutrient potential chemical sources organic andbiological sources agricultural productivity soil health 

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