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Anti-histone H1 Autoantibody: An Inducible Immunosuppressive Factor in Liver Transplantation

  • Akiko Katayama
  • Seiji Kawamoto
  • Yasushi Yamanaka
  • Takashi Kiso
  • Tsunehiro Aki
  • Toshiaki Nakano
  • Naoya Ohmori
  • Takeshi Goto
  • Shuji Sato
  • Jenny Chiang
  • Yayoi Shimada
  • Shigeru Goto
  • Chao-Long Chen
  • Kazuhisa Ono
Conference paper
Part of the Animal Cell Technology: Basic & Applied Aspects book series (ANICELLTECH, volume 15)

Abstract

In a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation, serum from the recipient has been shown to exhibit a strong immunosuppressive activity. However, molecular identity of those humoral factors has yet to be elucidated. We previously found that one of major immunosuppressive factors in the recipient serum was transplantation-induced IgG antibodies. Here we identified an antigen recognized by the regulatory IgG as histone H1. Polyclonal antibody raised against histone H1 not only suppressed allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), but also prolonged allograft survival in vivo. To elucidate mechanisms underlying the immunosuppressive activity, we generated murine anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which can suppress allogeneic MLR. One of selected mAbs, termed 16G9, showed a dose-dependent MLR inhibitory activity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that 16G9 specifically reacted with a part of murine splenocytes including T cells, B cells, and CD11b+ monocytes/macrophages. These results raise a possibility that 16G9 may suppress MLR via cross-reaction with target antigens on the leukocytes.

Keywords

Liver transplantation histone H1 monoclonal antibody 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by a grant of Research for Promoting Technological Seeds, which was conducted by Japan Science and Technology Agency. S. K. was also supported by the Uehara Memorial Foundation.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akiko Katayama
    • 1
  • Seiji Kawamoto
    • 1
  • Yasushi Yamanaka
    • 1
  • Takashi Kiso
    • 1
  • Tsunehiro Aki
    • 1
  • Toshiaki Nakano
    • 2
  • Naoya Ohmori
    • 3
  • Takeshi Goto
    • 3
  • Shuji Sato
    • 3
  • Jenny Chiang
    • 3
  • Yayoi Shimada
    • 3
  • Shigeru Goto
    • 2
    • 4
  • Chao-Long Chen
    • 2
  • Kazuhisa Ono
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduated School of Advanced Science of MatterHiroshima UniversityHigashi-HiroshimaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Surgery, Liver Transplant CenterChang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical CenterKaohsiungTaiwan
  3. 3.Faculty of Pharmaceutical SciencesJosai International UniversityToganeJapan
  4. 4.Iwao HospitalYufuinJapan

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