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Teaching and Learning Through Narrative Inquiry

Chapter
Part of the Self Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices book series (STEP, volume 9)

As teacher educators, we work at The Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd), a major provider of teacher education in Hong Kong. The HKIEd provides teacher education for about 80% of early childhood education teachers (HKIEd, 2007a) and about 80% and 25%, respectively, of new primary and secondary school teachers with degree and postgraduate qualifications (HKIEd, 2007b). The institute was founded in 1994 through an amalgamation of four former Colleges of Education and the Institute of Language in Education. As a single-purpose teacher education institute, learning and teaching are central to its mission, and HKIEd aims to prepare teachers “to become independent, analytical, critical and creative thinkers who can readily apply their knowledge” (HKIEd, 2006, p. 5).

Keywords

Teacher Education Child Development Teacher Education Program Teacher Knowledge Reflective Journal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyThe Hong Kong Institute of Education, Counselling and Learning NeedsTai PoHong Kong

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