Newton and Kant on Absolute Space: From Theology to Transcendental Philosophy

  • Michael Friedman
Part of the The Western Ontario Series In Philosophy of Science book series (WONS, volume 74)

Abstract

I argue that Kant’s methodological differences with Newton over absolute space and gravitational action at a distance are importantly related to metaphysical and theological issues about God and the creation of the material world in space. These differences constitute an essential part of Kant’s radical transformation of the very meaning of metaphysics as practiced by the predecessors – from ontological and theological issues to transcendental philosophy.

Keywords

Vortex Fermentation Stein Defend Huygens 

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© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Friedman

There are no affiliations available

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