Obesity Related Programming Statements in Infant Feeding Policies in Five European Countries

  • Elena Martin-Bautista
  • Cristina Campoy
  • Tamás Decsi
  • Szilvia Bokor
  • Julia von Rosen-von Hoewel
  • Kirsi Laitinen
  • Martina A. Schmid
  • Jane Morgan
  • Heather Gage
  • Berthold Koletzko
  • Monique Raats
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 646)

The aim of this study was to know how the early nutrition programming concept and its relation with long-term diseases such as obesity is reflected in policy recommendations on infant nutrition in five European countries (Finland, Germany, Hungary, Spain and England). After collating and evaluating infant nutrition policy documents, statements about early nutrition programming, as the origin of diseases such as obesity, were analysed. The number of policy documents analysed were 38 (England: 10, Finland: 2, Germany: 11, Hungary: 8, Spain: 7) with a total of 455 statements identified and categorized into 53 different health outcomes. Obesity was mentioned in 5.5% (n = 25) of the statements, the third most frequent outcome after allergy (14.1%, n = 64) and health in general (5.7%, n = 26). Twenty six percent (n = 6) of the obesity related statements referred to short-term duration of the effects, 48% (n = 12) to medium-term, 24% (n = 6) to long-term effects and the rest were not identified. Only 22% of the obesity statements were evidence based. The link between infant feeding and obesity is integrated into policy documents, but most of the statements did not fully specify the short, medium and long term health implications. Action may be required to keep documents up to date as new evidence emerges and to ensure the evidence base is properly recorded.

Keywords

Early nutrition programming European Union obesity policies 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elena Martin-Bautista
    • 1
  • Cristina Campoy
    • 1
  • Tamás Decsi
    • 2
  • Szilvia Bokor
    • 2
  • Julia von Rosen-von Hoewel
    • 4
  • Kirsi Laitinen
    • 3
  • Martina A. Schmid
    • 5
  • Jane Morgan
    • 5
  • Heather Gage
    • 5
  • Berthold Koletzko
    • 4
  • Monique Raats
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PaediatricsUniversity of GranadaGranadaSpain
  2. 2.Department of PaediatricsUniversity of PécsPécsHungary
  3. 3.Department of PaediatricsUniversity of TurkuFinland
  4. 4.Dr. von Hauner Children's HospitalLudwig-Maximilians-University of MunichGermany
  5. 5.Food, Consumer Behaviour and Health Research CentreUniversity of SurreyGuildfordUK

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