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Ammonia Policy Context and Future Challenges

  • Till Spranger
  • Zbigniew Klimont
  • Michel Sponar
  • Caroline Raes
  • Samantha M.H. Baker
  • Mark A. Sutton
  • Collin Gillespie
  • Y. Sim Tang
  • Helle Vibeke Andersen
  • Thomas Ellerman
  • Chris Flechard
  • Nick J. Hutchings

Ammonia emissions are major contributors to eutrophication and acidification of ecosystems and secondary PM2.5 concentrations in Europe. Reduction of the ammonia emissions in Europe has been on the agenda for more than a decade, first on a national scale, e.g. in Denmark and the Netherlands, followed by international efforts. The latter include the UNECE CLRTAP Gothenburg Protocol and EU directives and strategies.

This Cross Cutting Group considered the policy context of the ammonia problem, including socio-economic, environmental, institutional and technological aspects. Drawing on the scientific findings and recommendations from the other Working Groups and independent contributions from the participants, the Cross Cutting Group addressed the potential role of different policy options to help mitigate ecosystem and health impacts of ammonia emissions. It also discussed a need to adapt tools used in policy analysis (integrated assessment models, IAMs) and consequently evaluate policies in view of new findings.

Ammonia policies are becoming strongly interlinked with a number of other environmental and agricultural policies. In order to avoid the problem of pollution swapping, future policies need to consider these interactions. This in turn calls for extensions the tools currently used, verification of specific elements of the models, adaptation of monitoring networks, targeted measurement programs, but also possible revision of legislation in order to close existing loopholes and increase synergies in addressing nitrogen pollution at large. In that sense, priority should be given to measures aiming at reducing all kinds of nitrogen losses at farm level. Ammonia emission reduction policies must be analysed in a multi-effect (human health, acidification and eutrophication of the ecosystems and related biodiversity loss), multi-media (air, water, soil), multi-scale (hot spots, regional, European, global) framework.

Keywords

Critical Load Ammonia Emission Thematic Strategy Nitrate Vulnerable Zone National Emission Ceiling Directive 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Till Spranger
    • 1
  • Zbigniew Klimont
    • 2
  • Michel Sponar
    • 3
  • Caroline Raes
    • 4
  • Samantha M.H. Baker
    • 5
  • Mark A. Sutton
    • Collin Gillespie
      • 6
    • Y. Sim Tang
      • Helle Vibeke Andersen
        • 7
      • Thomas Ellerman
        • 7
      • Chris Flechard
        • 8
      • Nick J. Hutchings
        • 9
      1. 1.German Fed.Env.Agency (UBA)DessauGermany
      2. 2.IIASA, APDLaxenburgAustria
      3. 3.European CommissionBrusselsBelgium
      4. 4.European Commission, DG Agriculture and Rural Development, Unit F1 — EnvironmentGMO and Genetic ResourcesBrusselsBelgium
      5. 5.Department for Environment, Food and Rural AffairsAir and Environment Quality DivisionLondonUnited Kingdom
      6. 6.Air Policy UnitScottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA)StirlingUnited Kingdom
      7. 7.National Environmental Research InstituteAarhus UniversityRoskildeDenmark
      8. 8.Soils, Agronomy and Spatialization (SAS) UnitINRAFrance
      9. 9.Department of Agroecology, Faculty of Agricultural SciencesUniversity of AarhusTjeleDenmark

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