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Distinguishing Real Results from Instrumental Artifacts: The Case of the Missing Rain

  • Wendy Parker
Chapter
  • 403 Downloads
Part of the Boston Studies In The Philosophy Of Science book series (BSPS, volume 267)

Keywords

Wind Speed Nineteenth Century Wind Tunnel Rain Gauge Wind Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy Parker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyOhio UniversityAthensUSA

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