Abstract

The discovery of a two-stage Neolithic Demographic Transition (NDT) has major implications for social evolutionary models of early village development. I explore these implications through a comparative study of 36 early village sequences. A strong relationship is evident between the timing of the formation of systems of autonomous villages and the rapid growth phase of the NDT. This relationship can be explained by a conflict model of village growth and fissioning during the NDT. Further, this kind of early village trajectory has a strong correlation with the process of primary state formation, and is therefore of utmost importance for global models of long-term social evolution.

Keywords

Social evolution scalar stress village fissioning village formation chiefdom formation state formation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew Bandy
    • 1
  1. 1.SWCA Environmental ConsultantsBroomfieldUSA

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